Safe Exit

International Economic Harm Awareness Day

Making a difference

26th November 2022

Join us for International Economic Harm Awareness Day to raise awareness of the work that’s making a difference, so more people know how to access support when they need it.

Below we have a range of free resources, stories and tools for you to use to help spread the word with friends and whānau. 

What is economic harm?

It is behaviour towards a person that controls, restricts or removes their access to money, economic resources or participation in financial decisions.

Economic harm doesn’t leave visible marks. Like other forms of family violence, it can be subtle – beginning with the smallest breach of trust and then building over time. 

It can impact all ages, socio-economic groups, cultures, ethnicities and genders. And it can also present differently in some cultures due to traditions and beliefs, or the systemic experience of colonisation.

Economic harm is experienced in the context of power and control and is often intentional, but not always. 

What's happening in Aotearoa New Zealand

Across the country, organisations have been collaborating, evaluating and changing their approach to the way they support clients who are experiencing economic harm.

Impact snapshot
We have released a snapshot that underlines the shift that’s been happening to support better outcomes for New Zealanders experiencing economic harm.
Read
We can’t eliminate family violence if we don’t address its economic and financial impacts
We are recommending an immediate law change to recognise economic abuse as its own form of family violence. It is currently hidden within psychological abuse in the Family Violence Act.
Read
Addressing the financial impacts of family violence
Rachel Williams, from Hutt Valley Women’s Refuge, has been regularly referring clients to Good Shepherd NZ’s new economic harm support service. Rachel shares her thoughts about why the service is crucial to helping her support her clients to get back on their feet again.
Read
Leaving my relationship was only the start
When the bank wiped the debt, I just cried! It didn’t seem real. It halved my debt problem and I could finally begin to see the end – free from everything that tied me to this old relationship.
Read
Debt collecting: A new approach
General Manager, Mark Francis, from DebtManagers has provided debt relief for clients experiencing economic harm. Mark shares his perspective on why they want to do this.
Read
Support Service Pilot: Interim six-month report
Just over a year ago we began piloting an economic harm support service to address the financial and economic challenges of family violence.

Thanks to this new service, we've been able to identify actions that can improve outcomes for people experiencing economic harm.
Read
Finance company agrees to halve debt
When her former partner stopped making repayments on his loan Aotea Finance, after negotiations with Good Shepherd NZ through its new support service, agreed to split the loan and only seek repayment of half.
Read
Healthy Financial Relationships Toolkit
This new free toolkit gives people, no matter what stage their relationship is at, different entry points to start conversations about money, improve their understanding of their own relationship with money and learn what healthy financial relationships look like. It gives behaviours that can lead to economic harm less places to hide.
Visit
Webinar: Making a difference at work
Join this FSC Connect webinar to gain a better understanding of economic harm and what practical strategies and tips we can adapt to support our people at work who may be affected.
Register
We have released a snapshot that underlines the shift that’s been happening to support better outcomes for New Zealanders experiencing economic harm.
Read
We can’t eliminate family violence if we don’t address its economic and financial impacts
We are recommending an immediate law change to recognise economic abuse as its own form of family violence. It is currently hidden within psychological abuse in the Family Violence Act.
Read
Addressing the financial impacts of family violence
Rachel Williams, from Hutt Valley Women’s Refuge, has been regularly referring clients to Good Shepherd NZ’s new economic harm support service. Rachel shares her thoughts about why the service is crucial to helping her support her clients to get back on their feet again.
Read story
Leaving my relationship was only the start
When the bank wiped the debt, I just cried! It didn’t seem real. It halved my debt problem and I could finally begin to see the end – free from everything that tied me to this old relationship.
Read story
Support Service Pilot: Interim six-month report
Just over a year ago, we began piloting an economic harm support service to address the financial and economic challenges of family violence.

Thanks to this new service, we've been able to identify actions that can improve outcomes for people experiencing economic harm.
Read
Debt collecting: A new approach
General Manager, Mark Francis, from DebtManagers has provided debt relief for clients experiencing economic harm. Mark shares his perspective on why this approach is important.
Read
Finance company agrees to halve debt
When her former partner stopped making repayments on his loan the lender, after negotiations with Good Shepherd NZ through its new support service, agreed to split the loan and only seek repayment of half.
Read
Healthy Financial Relationships Toolkit
This new free toolkit gives people, no matter what stage their relationship is at, different entry points to start conversations about money, improve their understanding of their own relationship with money and learn what healthy financial behaviour looks like in relationships.
Visit
Webinar: Making a difference at work
Join this FSC Connect webinar to gain a better understanding of economic harm and what practical strategies and tips we can adapt to support our people at work who may be affected.
Watch
Previous
Next

Experiencing economic harm

Learn more about the impacts, barriers and challenges that people face through these lived experience stories below.

June

June:
The long-lasting impact

June shares her life story about how she has constantly grappled with economic harm and the struggles she faced trying to find her feet again.

Paige:
I thought I was bad with money

Paige didn’t realise the severity of the harm she was experiencing. When the relationship ended, Paige still had to figure out how to pay off over $30,000.
Hippie Young Woman Using her Smartphone in the City

Lara:
Be a proper girlfriend

Lara’s relationship, like many, started out healthy – but over time things started to change and when she decided to leave the relationship, she footed the bill.

International partners

We work with organisations across the world to raise awareness, advocate and explore how we can better support people experiencing economic harm. 

Our international partners:

This report outlines key international developments in response to economic abuse over the past 12 – 18 months across six participating countries: Australia, Canada, Israel, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

International Economic Abuse Awareness Day began in Canada in 2019 when the CCFWE called for greater recognition of the issue.

What can you do to support?

Tell ten people
Tell ten people about economic harm to help raise awareness so people experiencing it can access the support they need.
Share, share, share!
Take advantage of our free resources to raise awareness by sharing them with your friends and whānau.
Find free resources to share
Use your voice
Support us to advocate for economic abuse to be recognised as its own form of abuse
Train your teams
Talk to us about how we can support you with training and resources for your staff so you can provide better responses for your customers.
Get in touch
Back our support service
This service is vital for people to access the support they need to overcome the impacts of economic harm and achieve independence.

Talk to us about partnering to ensure this service remains, so we can support people to live free from violence.
Get in touch
Previous
Next
Tell ten people
Tell ten people about economic harm to help raise awareness so people experiencing it can access the support they need.
Share, share, share!
Take advantage of our free resources to raise awareness by sharing them with your friends and whānau.
Find free resources to share
Use your voice
Support us to advocate for economic abuse to be recognised as its own form of abuse
Train your teams
Talk to us about how we can support you with training and resources for your staff so you can provide better responses for your customers.
Get in touch
Back our support service
This service is vital for people to access the support they need to overcome the impacts of economic harm and achieve independence.

Talk to us about partnering to ensure this service remains, so we can support people to live free from violence.
Get in touch
Previous
Next

Make a difference

We are a not-for-profit organisation working to improve the financial and social wellbeing of New Zealanders.
The resources on this website are provided free of charge to make sure they are available for people who need them.
Consider making a donation to ensure we can continue supporting those people who need our help.

You can also make a donation, or set up a recurring donation, by contacting us directly

accounts@goodshepherd.org.nz

Coming up...

International Economic Harm Awareness Day

Making a difference

26th November 2022
Join us to celebrate and raise awareness of the work that’s making a difference so people experiencing economic harm can access support when they need it.
We have a range of free resources, stories and tools for you to download and use to help spread the word with friends and whānau. 
 

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