Safe Exit

Identifying economic harm isn’t so easy, or even possible in some cases, due to its lack of visibility. 

Below are potential red flags that have been identified by people with their own experience of economic harm.

Individually these indicators may mean very little, however several together can show a pattern. This does not necessarily mean economic harm is being experienced. 

These red flags are a starting point to let you know some difficulty could be occurring, and a conversation with the employee could be useful.

Potential Red Flags

Potential Red Flags

Identifying economic harm isn’t so easy, or even possible in some cases, due to its lack of visibility. 

Below are potential red flags that have been identified by people with their own experience of economic harm.

Individually these indicators may mean very little, however several together can show a pattern. This does not necessarily mean economic harm is being experienced. 

These red flags are a starting point to let you know some difficulty could be occurring, and a conversation with the employee could be useful.

Red flags

Anxiety about getting paid on time, or needing pay in advance
Asking for annual leave to be paid out without explanation
Asking work to pay bills or redirect money to a different account
Not having access to their own or joint bank account
Having no money for necessities, yet having an income that should cover it
Seeming guilty and defensive when talking about spending money on everyday items
Using a shared email account
The employer being contacted by government departments regarding redirection, fines or other debts not being paid
Ongoing transport issues getting to work – or being picked up and dropped off
Partner ringing a lot, texting or showing up - checking up or asking about pay details
Withdrawing from social interaction - unable to participate in social or work activities that cost money – acting awkwardly or not wanting to talk about why
Appearing uncomfortable or fearful when talking about their partner
Presentism – regularly working late, not wanting to go home or asking for extra shifts
Absenteeism – regularly late to work, not coming at all (sick) or other things happening at home
Seeming emotional or irrational – all over the place with their thinking or behaviour
A change in appearance, or behaviour, or drop in work performance – usually competent, professional, and proficient – now a lack of concentration or preoccupied
Hearing concerns from other colleagues that things aren’t good at home
Change in employment status within the family such as job loss or reduced hours - leading to comments about extreme financial strain
Forced to sign immigration papers or other documentation
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  • Anxiety about getting paid on time, or needing pay in advance
  • Asking for annual leave to be paid out without explanation
  • Asking work to pay bills or redirect money to a different account
  • Not having access to their own/joint bank account
  • Having no money for necessities, yet having an income that should cover it
  • Seeming guilty and defensive when talking about spending money on everyday items
  • Using a shared email account
  • The employer being contacted by government departments regarding redirection, fines or other debts not being paid
  • Ongoing transport issues getting to work – or being picked up and dropped off
  • Partner ringing a lot, texting or showing up – checking up or asking about pay details
  • Withdrawing from social interaction. This could include situations in which they’re unable to participate in social or work activities that cost money. Then acting acting awkwardly or not wanting to talk about why
  • Appearing uncomfortable or fearful when talking about their partner
  • Presentism – regularly working late, not wanting to go home, or asking for extra shifts
  • Absenteeism – regularly late to work or not coming at all (sick)– can’t afford to, or other things happening at home
  • Seeming emotional or irrational – all over the place with their thinking or behaviour
  • A change in appearance, or behaviour, or drop in work performance – usually competent, professional, and proficient – now a lack of concentration or preoccupied
  • Hearing concerns from other colleagues that things aren’t good at home
  • Change in employment status within the family such as job loss or reduced hours leading to comments about extreme financial strain
  • Forced to sign immigration papers or other documentation
 

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