Safe Exit

Economic harm has both short and long term consequences. 

The impact is complex, and cuts across many environments, often leading to years of debilitating economic and social conditions..

The Impact

The Impact

Economic harm has both short and long term consequences. 

The impact is complex, and cuts across many environments, often leading to years of debilitating economic and social conditions.

Self-esteem
It is common to feel exploited, depressed, distressed, embarrassed, angry and stupid. Shame, fear, low self-worth and self-belief can lead to physical and mental health issues.

Anxiety about financial matters is also a problem - excessively worrying about overspending, long after a relationship has ended. Confidence to rebuild a future, have trust and navigate new relationships is significantly diminished.
Social isolation
The need for support can increase dependence on family and services, often causing fragmented relationships. Personal safety can also be compromised, requiring a move to a new area, away from local supports.

This lack of support, and real choice, can force people into long-term periods of social isolation.
Credit and debt
Economic harm can cause excessive debt and a damaged credit history that lessens one's ability to meet basic needs and can lead to homelessness.
Employment
Remaining in or obtaining new employment can also be impacted by the lack of resources, or poor credit history. It can also be affected by a partner or ex-partner's interference.
Legal system
Legal and other financial challenges around child support, access, and ongoing court costs can also be debilitating both financially and emotionally, and can continue long into the future.
Lack of choice
Any decisions that are made when people are in 'survival mode' can lead to consequences such as even more debt, recordable offences or criminal charges, which can influence or restrict future choices.
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The impact on children

In families where harm is occurring, it is often hoped that children are protected by not seeing or hearing what’s happening. 

There are however psychological, emotional, environmental and economic factors associated with harm that can have a significantly negative impact.

Children’s basic and developmental needs can be disrupted or limited, along with their social and educational opportunities, due to lack of access to finances. 

Parents or caregivers can become emotionally unavailable and children may need to negotiate issues that occur at home. 

They can be left feeling responsible, confused and isolated. 

Their confidence and self-esteem can become eroded, impacting their overall wellbeing and psychological recovery. In the long term, economic harm can negatively affect a child’s mental wellbeing, and lead to social or behavioural issues, depending on their age, the level of harm and the length of exposure.

 

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